Kerrville, texas

Doyle School Community Center

110 West Barnett

Kerrville, TX  78028


830.257.4446

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Offering Education&Hope  to our community The seed

THE SEED


In 2001 and 2002, Bill Blackburn, of Partners in Ministry, and John Setnan, of Community Outreach, initiated several community events in the Doyle (aka Kerrville North) community.  As Bill and John engaged the participants at these events, asking what they would like to see to to improve the area, the overriding response was a community center.

FOUNDATIONS & SUPPORT

Without the efforts and insight of Bill Blackburn and the support of Partners in Ministry, the community desire may have still been a dream.  Bill recruited the Cailloux Foundation as a major benefactor that made the purchase of the old Doyle School building possible.  The generous Cailloux gift also provided for initial operating funds and a small building endowment.  Bill recruited a local attorney to help file the incorporation papers and a local CPA to help secure the 501(c)(3) status.  He also recruited the first DSCC President and served five years as an Advisory Director of the Board.  Continued generous support from the Cailloux Foundation as well as local and state foundations, such as the Peterson Foundation, PHS Foundation, Kemmerer Foundation, Charity Ball and many others, has allowed the Doyle School Community Center to continue to grow and serve the community.

No one is useless in this world who  lightens the burden of it for someone  else.                            Benjamin Franklin

KIDS ROCK


LEARNING


PLAYING


THE NAME


Up until the fall of 1963, The Doyle School was the public school for black students in Kerrville.  The school which had students from the first through twelfth grade had slightly over 100 students at its largest.  It became the intellectual, cultural and social growth center of the community.  Most of the students that traveled, traveled because of the school.  Every high school student was required to learn to play a musical instrument.  Every elementary student was expected to participate in plays.  With the closing of Doyle, many of the most educated people in the community were dispersed, and local programs for rounding students and enlightening the community ceased.  It was the hope of the community that some of that community spark could be reignited through a community center.  Of course Doyle, the institution that was so vital to the development of most individuals in that community, is a name everyone wanted to keep.  In August 2003, the Doyle School Community Center opened its doors for the first time.